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  • Giles Li, Executive Director of the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, talks to Tufts medical and public health students visiting the Pao Arts Center in Chinatown

    Tufts University School of Medicine Department of Public Health and Community Medicine’s new field course “Introduction to Building Healthy Neighborhoods and Communities” immerses students in Boston’s vibrant Chinatown neighborhood.

  • Qausarat Ogunneye, a UMass Boston junior, at Tufts School of Medicine

    A program brings UMass Boston students to campus for hands-on experiences in clinical and lab settings, and the relationships they develop with graduate students and faculty, students learn about a range of potential careers in medicine, public health, basic sciences and other areas.

  • Dr. Ronald Pies, clinical professor of psychiatry, examines how the evolving nature of male role models in the media may be linked to the rising rates of sexual assault and mass shootings.

  • With the support of a new professorship at Tufts University School of Medicine, Signe Flieger, the first appointee to the Tufts Health Plan Professorship in Health Care Policy Research, will be able to continue her research about health-care policies and their impact on patients in this changing landscape.

  • Thomas Stopka, associate professor of public health and community medicine

    Tom Stopka, Ph.D., M.H.S., assistant professor of public health & community medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, uses an innovative analysis combining geographic information systems, spatial epidemiology, and statistical modeling to identify Hepatitis C hotspots in Massachusetts.

  • A new program founded by Lisa Gualtieri, an assistant professor of public health and community medicine at Tufts, will test if donated, recycled fitness trackers--Jawbone, Withings, Fitbit, and Garmin--can help underserved populations get healthier.

  • Thomas Stopka, associate professor of public health and community medicine

    Tufts University School of Medicine joins forces with the state’s three other medical schools to help future doctors confront the growing opioid crisis. Of the four medical schools—the University of Massachusetts, Boston University, Harvard and Tufts—only Tufts had a course on addiction medicine already in place.

  • Margie Skeer, an associate professor of public health and community medicine

    After an internship at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center in New Jersey opened her eyes to heart-wrenching stories of lost childhoods and broken lives, Margie Skeer devoted her life to a career in public health. Now an associate professor of public health and community medicine, she works to prevent substance abuse and risky sexual behavior in adolescents. Sometimes the solution to these kinds of big issues can be elegantly simple, family mealtimes, for example.

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